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USA / Why Hillary lost the presidential race?

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Hillary Clinton lost an election to someone who was considered to be the most divisive and unpopular person ever to contest the Presidential race in the history of the United States. How does anyone explain this extraordinary thing that has just happened, which has shocked the whole world?

Charles Krauthammer a Conservative columnist said, Donald Trump’s win “is an ideological and electoral revolution of the kind we haven’t seen since Reagan. What this means, ideologically, is that Republican Party has become a populist party and the country is going to be without a classically conservative party.”

Krauthammer explained, “If…Trump wins, this is an ideological and electoral revolution of the kind we haven’t seen since Reagan. What this means, ideologically, is that Republican Party has become a populist party and the country is going to be without a classically conservative party.”

He explained, “Net globalization, trade is always a positive, but net means there are winners or losers. And Trump is a guy who understood that. He’s spoken to those who lost out. he said, I speak for you. I don’t know whether his remedies are going to work, but certainly what we’re seeing is an ideological shift, speaking for the white working class, and also, the non-white working class, and it’s going to be an electoral shift because that means that the old Rust Belt is now in play permanently for the Republicans. As is, on the other hand, with the rise of Hispanic registration, Hispanic voting, the classically safe southern states for Republicans are no longer that classically safe.”

That’s partly true. Hillary Clinton was so closely identified with the establishment that for many in America, defeating her akin to showing their middle finger to the establishment.

The media can also be blamed for Hillary’s defeat because it lost all shred of neutrality and became her most enthusiastic supporters. The media began telling people what to believe and who to support, and once it did that, it lost all credibility. The media’s support backfired on Hillary, as people simply hated the American liberal media and the best way to express their hatred was to vote for Trump.

As Washington Post’s media columnist Margaret Sullivan said in an article, “Journalists — college-educated, urban and, for the most part, liberal — are more likely than ever before to live and work in New York City and Washington, D.C., or on the West Coast. And although we touched down in the big red states for a few days, or interviewed some coal miners or unemployed autoworkers in the Rust Belt, we didn’t take them seriously. Or not seriously enough.”

The best analysis of the election was made by New York Times columnist Roger Cohen, who explained why Trump was able to beat Clinton. He said in his column in the New York Times that it was as much a revolt against the liberal class by a significant section of the American population as a vote against Hillary Clinton: “To give Trump credit, he had a single formidable intuition: That American anger and uncertainty in the face of the inexorable march of globalization and technology had reached such a pitch that voters were ready for disruption at any cost.

“Enough of elites; enough of experts; enough of the status quo; enough of the politically correct; enough of the liberal intelligentsia and cultural overlords with their predominant place in the media; enough of the financial wizards who brought the 2008 meltdown and stagnant incomes and jobs disappearing offshore. That, in essence, was Trump’s message. A New Yorker, he contrived to channel the frustrations of the heartland, a remarkable sleight of hand. Ohio and Wisconsin lurched into the Trump camp.

“This upset victory over Hillary Clinton, the representative par excellence of the American political establishment, amounted to Brexit in American form. Ever since Britain’s perverse, self-defeating vote last June to leave the European Union, it seemed plausible that the same anti-globalization, often xenophobic forces could carry Trump to victory.

“And so it proved. The disenfranchised, often living lives of great precariousness, arose and spoke. Clinton never quite seemed to understand their frustrations, as her challenger for the Democratic nomination, Bernie Sanders, did.”

All we can say to that is, it’s democracy, there are winners and losers. But the world moves on. Congratulations President Donald Trump!

Author: Raghav Hegde – India

sourcephoto: pinterest

http://zappernews.ro/

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